Manzanar High School

High School Yearbooks for 1944 and 1945

our world
1943-1944
manzanar high
Valediction

See USE NOTICE on Home Page.

 
All photographs on this page are from the Manzanar Highschool Yearbooks.
OUR WORLD 1943-1944
VALEDICTION 1944-1945




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Manzanar Internment Timeline - 1942-1945

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 Choral Group
Choral Group

 ASB 1st Semester
Associated Student Body (1st Semester)

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To Class

Baton Girls
Baton Girls


Girls League
Girls League (2nd Semester)
Yearbook Signatures

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program

program

program

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 Manzanar Highschool Portraits

kamimura
Margaret Kamimura

kosaka
Minoru Kosaka

iriye
Hiroko Iriye

hazama
Katsuji Hazama

hatae
Mariko Hatae

fujii
Osamu Fujii

fukushima
Clara Fukushima

araki
Alice Araki

In years to come, when the war is over, and peace has returned to the world, people may say to you "What was Manzanar?" Then I hope you may say that Manzanar was a war time city that sprang up from the sands of the desert of Inyo and returned to desert with the end of the war. It was the largest city between Los Angeles and Reno. It was a city serving a war time purpose where people lived in peace and good will, where there was a school system that taught young citizens the ideals of American citizenship, where schools were of as high a rank as other California schools, and where students dedicated their future lives to the American way of living. I hop you may say that Manzanar was an experience worth living, where the important realities of life were made clear and where there was time and opportunity to prepare for participation in the work of winning the peace based on tolerance, understanding and good will. The graduates of Manzanar have a great contribution to make in determining the kind of world that is to come after the war.

Ralph P. Merritt
Project Director


eto
Keiji Eto

akemoto
Sadaye Akemoto

hirabara
Thomas Hirabara

okimoto
Yoshiye Okimoto

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 a-capella choir
All Girls A-Capella Choir under the direction of Louis Frizzell

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Manzanar Highschool Portraits

noda
Yasuko Noda

niwa
Ujinobu Niwa

shintani
Tadao Shintani

sakata
Tsugimaro Sakata

 
science club

Science Club

okamoto
Toru Okamoto

kaji
Bruce Kaji

sakamoto
Shizuko Sakamoto

ono
Sam Ono

All people of Japanese ancestry living in the states of Washington, Oregon, California and Southern Arizona were excluded from certain areas designated as "military areas" and relocated first to temporary detention centers and later, to one of 10 permanent War Relocation Authority camps. They could take only what they could carry. Many lost farms, crops, businesses and many personal belongings. Most were given less than 2 weeks and as short as 48 hours to prepare for their departure. Losses incurred during this time are estimated in the billions of dollars.

Beginning in march, 1942, the first Japanese Americans arrived in Manzanar. Located in the Owens Valley, it was at one time a fertile area with many apple farms. As Los Angeles grew, the water from the valley was diverted to the Los Angeles Aqueduct and as a result, the Owens Valley degenerated into a man-made desert. Over the next six months, Manzanar became home to over 10,000 people in 504 barracks. Each family was allowed a space of twenty by twenty-five feet. The rooms were furnished with army cots, straw mattresses and electricity. There were communal mess halls, laundry facilities and latrines.

nakashima
Sumiko Nakashima

takechi
Ruth Takechi

shikami
Reggie Shikami

okumura
Nobuko Okumura

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Manzanar Highschool Portraits

okamoto
Mitsuo Okamoto

sano
Miko Sano

shimizu
Miyeko Shimizu

tanaka
Miyoshi Tanaka

 
orchestra

Manzanar High orchestra under the direction of Louis Frizzell

murata
Mamoru Murata

matsuoka
Lucille Matsuoka

shimamura
Kazuko Shimamura

segimoto
Kiyomi Segimoto

sakata
Florence Sakata

morimoto
Irene Morimoto

nagai
Kasuko Nagai

nakata
Kenneth Nakata

On December 17, 1944, the government announced the end of the mass exclusion order against Japanese Americans. On December 18, the Supreme Court ruled in Ex parte Endo, that the government could no longer detain loyal citizens against their will. This case was represented by Mistuye Endo, whose brother served in the 442nd RCT. This allowed the West Coast to be opened for resettlement. The last camp, Tule Lake was closed on March 20, 1946.

It was difficult task to resettle the West Coast as Japanese American families were faced with racism and discrimination in housing and employment. Many were able only to find domestic and lower paying jobs. Despite their losses of property, businesses, homes and communities, in time, the Japanese Americans were able to rebuild their lives, take care of their aging parents and instill high educational goals for their children.

sato
Charles Sato

miyamoto
Frank Miyamoto

shimoda
Anne Shimoda

ogawa
Chiyeko Ogawa

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Toyo Miyatake - resident Manzanar internment photographer
Internment of Japanese Americans
Japanese American National Museum
War Relocation Camps in Arizona
Photographs by Dorothy Lange
FDR and Japanese American Internment
Photographs by Masumi Hayashi
Densho Digital Repository
Betty U
Betty Umehara

 T. Miyatake
Toyo Miyatake
Toshiyuki T
Toshiyuki Tomita

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Mt. Whitney Pack Trains - Frank Chrysler and Ted Cook Days  
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Vintage Sierra Nevada Panoramas  

20-Mule-Team History  

 More Manzanar High School Portraits & History

 
 

  More Manzanar History & Manzanar Free Press

 

 Owens Valley Aqueduct Portraits & History

 

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This page was last updated on 17 July 2019