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Aubrey Hemming Journal



See USE NOTICE on Home Page.

Many thanks to Aubrey Hemming (Clarkston, WA.) for sending me the pictures and text for this page.



My father, Mr. Allington Gordon Hemming was born on July 11, 1889 in Little Rock, Arkansas. In the early 1900's, probably about 1910, he worked in Los Angeles for a music company. Some time along here he joined the Elks, Scottish Rite and the Mason's. He was a life-long member in all of these organizations. He went further in the Mason's where later he became a 32nd degree Mason. He was a member in the Long Beach chapter. During the time he was a member he made many friends. Prior to 1931, a Mr. Cotton, who was a "higher up" in the Carson part of the Carson and Dominguez estate, asked my father if he would be interested in being the supervisor of the Carson estate. Well needless to say it was a yes! As it worked out, Dad made a success of his job. I don't know what prior experience he might have had in this line, but he did an excellent job anyway. We raised lots of alfalfa for the dairies that were in and around Norwalk, CA at that time. We also raised sugar beets and walnuts for the Los Angeles Nut House Company. I don't think it's any longer in business.

My father also was to help the families as needed and collect the rent from the Japanese American farmers on Dominguez Hills. Some of the farmers rented and some, a very few, owned their own property. Most if not all of these Japanese farmers not only liked and trusted my father, but they also respected him. I can remember many wonderful Christmas and New Year's dinners we had at their homes and also when they were invited to our home.

When the attack on Pearl Harbor came along and the Japanese were forced to go to the relocation camps, the farmers got together and asked Dad if he would look after their belongings and equipment until they returned, and if needed, sell them if they needed the money. He did this for them and at times, when asked, he also took them articles as they were needed. My father passed away February 10, 1951 while I was training at the San Diego Naval Hospital Corps School during the Korean War.

Aubrey Hemming (October 2005)

Agricultural Commission Letter #1

Agricultural Commission Letter #2

Citizens Defense Corps Certificate

California 6th Infantry Appointment



kurashige family
The Kurashige Family who farmed the Carson & Dominguez Estate.
 

Mr. Smoot
Mr. Smart of the McKinily Grammar School and some students. Aubrey's Dad, A.L. Hemming, is standing at he back of the truck with his ever present hat on. This group of Japanese Americans was being sent to the Gila River Relocation Camp in Arizona.
(May 7, 1942)

Letters to Al Hemming from Japanese Americans at Manzanar
 

Owens Valley Reception Center
Manzanar, Calif.
April 5, 1942



Mr. A.G. Hemming
Compton, Calif.

Dear Mr. Hemming,

How are you? We are all fine and healthy except some time the food is bad.

We all like to thank you for the help you did to us. Mr. Hemming how are the Dominguez & Hill getting along after we left?

It is very dusty and windy out here. Without the dust and wind it is a fine place for living.

We are all crowed together in one room which is 20 feet by 25 feet. The whole camp is one mile long at the present time.

I have to report to office every morning and noon for working which I lived on other end of camp, and its about one mile to office.

We are the only one from the Dominguez Hill at the present time.

I wished some of our neighbor would show up.

I hope you are taking care of celery. How is the price? I like to know everything is all right.

Yours truly,
Bob Sugasawara
Postmarked: April 11, 1942

 
 

OVR Center
Manzanar, Calif.
April 22, 1942


Mr. A.G. Hemming
P.O. Box 171
Compton, Calif.

Dear Mr. Hemming,

Thanks for the letter which I have received April 20, 1942.

I have heard from my brother speed that he gave you the money for Edison closing bill. I have received two trunks from my brother.

I guess the celery price must be cheap at that time, and Inatomi boys have written to me that they worked for you at forty cents an hour. By the way, whom did you sell the celery?

My Father, Mother and rest of my brother is all fine. We boys are all working, collecting stumps, rubbish, many other works. Although we are loafing most of the time, it certainly is a easy work compared from home.

On April 19, 1942 the Owens Valley Reception Center had a first wedding. For few days the weather was fine, but again it is dusty. Thee isn't anything much to say so I am closing my letter. By the way, I certainly appreciate what you have done for us and my family's regards.

Yours truly,
Bob Sugasawara
Postmarked: April 23, 1942

 

35-8-1
Manzanar, Calif.
August 20, 1942


Mr. A.G. Hemming
P.O. Box 171
Compton, Calif.

Dear Mr. Hemming,

How are you? I hope everybody is fine and healthy. I imagine Dominguez Hill is rather deserted after all the Japanese family have left.

Is there any other radish people farming yet at Hill?

Manzanar was really a terrible place to live, but after living here for year and a half, we rather got used to weather and dust storm, although its still hot during mid day. Temperature is 100 - 120 degrees.

I could picture you, you're getting old. So am I and my wife, and she is very weak and her eyes are bad and her teeth which she have to have fix.

Staying in camp like this and spend money without hardly any income. I'm short of money so can you please send the money which you have sold our celery when we have evacued. My wife got to fix her health. Incidentally, can you sale the spray machine and hoses and have the money send to me. If you sale these things please send the bill of sale with the money.

By the way we only received two trunks and haven't received the box, so please forward the box. I believe its in north-end corner of your shed where the spray hose and canvas is left.

Yours truly,
Bob Sugasawara

P.S. - Please take care, and my best regard to rest.
Postmarked: April 30, 1942

 

August 30, 1943
35-8-1
Manzanar, Calif.


Mr. A.G. Hemming
P.O. Box 171
Compton, Calif.

Dear Mr. Hemming,

Thanks for the letter which I have received few day ago.

I'm very sorry to hear that you have been sick for two month. As I heard from you there must be quite few new farmer in Hill.

Regard to the box will you please send it in express. If you can, sale the sprayer, two high pressure spray hose, canvas and the planter for $100.00. Incidentally if it is rather difficult to sale for $100.00, sale it at less than $100.00, and please sale this things.

About my boys, couple of them is out side in Eastern States, and rest is here in Manzanar.

Soon as you sale this things will you lease send the bill of sale and send the money in money order. Thank you.

Please take care of yourself and my best regard to rest. I'll be writing. Goodbye.

Sincerely yours,
Bob Sugasawara
35-8-1
Manzanar, Calif.

Postmarked: August 30, 1943


Calligraphy on background poster: "Saving is like roots. Peace is like flowers." 1930-1945?

Related Websites: Dominguez Rancho
Carson Estate
Rancho San Pedro
Rancho San Pedro and the Dominguez Ranch Adobe





 
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This page was last updated on 27 August 2017